The Latest On Migraines

A migraine is a throbbing or pulsating headache that is often one sided (unilateral) and associated with nausea; vomiting; sensitivity to light, sound, smells; sleep disruption, and depression. Attacks are often recurrent and tend to become less severe as the migraine sufferer ages. Migraines are classified under the symptoms they produce. The two most common types are migraine with aura and migraine without aura. Less common types include the following: Basilar artery migraine, Carotidynia, Headache-free migraine, Ophthalmoplegic migraine, Status migraine.

Basilar Migraine Basilar migraine or basilar artery migraine as it is sometimes called, is one of those atypical headaches that can have frightening symptoms. This pain is unlike usual migraines. The pain is commonly severe, throbbing at localized at the rear of the head. It may be accompanied by severe vertigo (meaning that the room is spinning), difficulty walking and most usually, visual disturbances. Other common migraine headache symptoms may also occur such as nausea, vomiting and having the light and sounds bother you. Rarer symptoms are jerking movements of the eyes, ringing in the ears and loss of consciousness. Severe vertigo is quite common and can be disabling.

Just When You Thought You Had Heard It All...

Testing For Basilar Migraine If you present to a physician with the symptoms of basilar migraine, unfortunately since it mimics a stroke so closely, be prepared for kind of a full work up to rule out stroke. This most probably will include an MRI or CT of the brain right away and possibly an MRA to look at the arteries of the brain.

Ocular migraines won't permanently rob you of your vision. However, they can be hazardous if they happen during situations like driving. The symptoms of ocular migraines can be very close to the symptoms of other problems, including retinal tear or retinal detachment. They can also mimic the signs of stroke. If you've never had a migraine or ocular migraine before, you should talk to your ophthalmologist or see a doctor right away to rule out something more serious.

Treatment is primarily prevention. Learning your personal triggers and avoiding them is the most effective way to stop ocular migraines. Medications are sometimes prescribed for migraines. However, they're rarely effective. Many people have successfully beaten migraines with a combination of biofeedback and avoiding their triggers.

Different Types of Migraine Migraines have been around for quite a long time and there is still a lot to learn about their causes, triggers and treatment. They are no longer regarded as just 'bad headaches' but are recognized as something much more-a bit like the common cold and influenza (which is a lot more than a very heavy cold). Common Migraines Migraines are very painful and to ask one group a 'common' migraine may appear to be a bit of a misnomer but we got to start somewhere. This type has much of the basic symptoms like throbbing pain in the mind and is often accompanied by a sense of nausea. It is also hand in hand with a loss of balance, sometimes with the room seeming to spin and at such moments it is better to sit down, preferably with your back against a firm support that you know won't move.

Basal Migraine Symptoms Regardless of the name used to describe the headache, it is both rare and generally very severe. Because of the scarcity of the basal migraine researchers are still learning more about the condition with limited funding. In addition, it is not likely that most medical practitioners have experience with the basal migraine symptoms which makes the probability of a misdiagnosis higher.

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